Tag Archives: Civil Rights

Link: Should Mom-and-Pops That Forgo Gay Weddings Be Destroyed? — The Atlantic

Mob “shaming” tactics do nothing to advance LGBT rights, just as refusal to bake a cake does little to stop them. We need to follow a better way – dialogue, grace, patience. Both sides.

A very good read.  An excerpt:

The owners of Memories Pizza are, I think, mistaken in what their Christian faith demands of them. And I believe their position on gay marriage to be wrongheaded. But I also believe that the position I’ll gladly serve any gay customers but I feel my faith compels me to refrain from catering a gay wedding is less hateful or intolerant than let’s go burn that family’s business to the ground.

And I believe that the subset of the gay-rights movement intent on destroying their business and livelihood has done more harm than good here—that they’ve shifted their focus from championing historic advances for justice to perpetrating small injustices against marginal folks on the other side of the culture war. “The pizzeria discriminated against nobody,” Welch wrote, “merely said that it would choose not to serve a gay wedding if asked. Which it never, ever would be, because who asks a small-town pizzeria to cater a heterosexual wedding, let alone a gay one?” They were punished for “expressing a disfavored opinion to a reporter.”

via Should Mom-and-Pops That Forgo Gay Weddings Be Destroyed? — The Atlantic.

Not just believing. Acting.

For a variety of personal reasons, I find myself musing these questions lately:

1. Can we make any real progress against poverty, sickness, hatred, abuse?
The sin is in us, in our hearts from the beginning. Yet I believe the Gospel is bigger than our collective and individual sin, and God’s redemption of our hearts will affect  human lives and systems.

2. Must all progress be made individually?
It seems like attempts to reform systems end in failure, mismanagement, or a return to a bad status quo. Is there no “economy of scale” to social work?

3. What is the biblical response to injustice?
If it were clear, wouldn’t everybody be responding?

*****

Ran across this controversial and somewhat jumbled essay (memoir? call to action? position paper?) by Bob Zellner, a man who emerged from his Southern roots to become a Civil Rights activist.  It’s not always easy to follow his point; many of his conclusions do not seem to follow from any stated premises or evidence. His support of unionized labor will anger some; his blunt criticism of Southern mores will offend many.

But I recommend the essay as a thought-provoking weekend read:

Thoughts on Port Huron (written in 2012)

From his introduction:

It’s important what a person believes, so tell me what you think, but more importantly, tell me what you do and have done. In Alabama I saw folks chanting affirmations of faith, knowing they did not mean it. My quest became why people’s actions and beliefs were so far apart. I was fascinated with why so few white Southerners risked life and limb or even ostracism and poverty in the struggle against segregation and racial oppression.

Searching for authenticity, commitment and risk, as well as harmony between belief and action, I sought people doing things challenging and exciting to me. The second of five boys with a schoolteacher mother and preacher father, it was unlikely I would meet Dr. Martin Luther King and Ms Rosa Parks as a college student in Montgomery and become part of America’s most exciting History — the Civil Rights Movement. Perhaps it was providential that my Methodist College, Huntingdon, was located in Montgomery, the cradle of the modern civil rights struggle.

My odyssey from KKK to MLK was a stretch. Dad, James Abraham Zellner, a Methodist minister was once a Klan organizer, a Kleagle. He and Mom, Ruby Hardy Zellner, graduated from Bob Jones College now located in Greenville, SC Even though it is now called a “university,” it is not widely known as a hot bed of Southern Liberalism. What’s worse, I was named for Dr. Bob Jones after he performed the marriage of Mom and Dad. In 2012-speak, that means I come from a line of Fundamentalist Terrorist. I must have been a disappointment to Godfather Dr. Bob. Have you ever noticed how fundamentalism and terrorism go together?

The nexus is ubiquitous throughout history. A fundamentalist, Muslim, Christian, or any other can be peace loving and protect those inside his circle. As a fundamentalist, however, his ability and willingness to harm those outside his circle, i.e. infidels, is altered. Not only is the fundamentalist allowed to harm others, his creed may even require him to do so. Presently a fundamentalist, then, depending on circumstances, voila, a terrorist is born. My father, grandfather and uncles in Birmingham were Klan activists. A more ruthless gaggle of terrorist is hard to imagine. Was their Klavern responsible for killing four little girls guilty of nothing more than going to Sunday school at the 16th Avenue Church one September morning in1963?

The last paragraph rings true:

Once, when trapped in a Montgomery church, Ms. [Rosa] Parks helped five students escape arrest, but not before saying to me, “Bob, when you see something wrong you have to do something about it. You must take action — you can’t study injustice forever.

 

You can read more about Bob and his continuing crusade to protect voting rights here:

Activist Issues New Awakening for Voting Rights

Concert Report: The Restoration (Album release: Constance)

There are local musicians, and there are local musicians. Friday night we were privileged to hear Daniel Machado lead The Restoration in an incredible performance of their new album Constance. The evening was so awesome that it deserves its own report. 

I love how this band dresses the part for whatever story they're trying to tell
I love how this band dresses the part for whatever story they’re trying to tell

The Restoration is a collection of talented musicians who play a variety of instruments. I’m not sure what genre fits them best; perhaps folk-rock? They incorporate older styles and skills into a modern musical landscape, blending the modern with the traditional.

What grabbed my attention about Constance several months ago was its back-history. Daniel was researching the history of his own hometown (Lexington) and was struck by the insidious racism that marked South Carolina’s history for a century (or more) after the Civil War. His research led to creative impulse, and this incredible album is the result.

The Columbia newspaper did a series of articles on the band and their historic/social project — I highly recommend them. The first one includes a lengthy interview with Daniel and the USC American Lit professor who helped him find literary voices from America’s racist past:
Restoring the past in hopes of a better future
Paste Magazine: 50 States Project (review)

Daniel Machado published two interesting articles on Scene SC while they were recording the album:
Part 1: Out of a Nashville Studio and into the Heart of Local Racism
Part 2: Smiling Faces, Beautiful Places, and Angry White Men

And you can watch the band’s short film about the use of shape-note singing in Constance
The Making of Constance

The CD release show was a great example of how music and performance and literature and art can all combine to communicate unified story. I felt like I was watching a living “Multi-Genre Project.” The release show band included additional musicians — our friends Steven & Collin; a cellist, a sax player, etc. If you hit The Restoration’s site you can hear some of the tracks, but the entire experience of sitting in the Trustus Theater and watching the music unfold live can’t really be reproduced in a recording studio. Sometimes the emotions behind the music get lost in the digitization. I still prefer the energy of a live show to a “perfect” CD.

(If you go listen, don’t miss “Constance.” That song will stick in your mind for days.)

I should mention that two interesting acts prepared us for the performance onslaught of The Restoration. The first were dancers from the Alternacirque dancers in Columbia. I don’t know what else to say other than “a displaced tribal belly dancer originally from New Orleans found herself in Columbia and opened a studio.” Lol.  It was one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen ….

Incredibly cool = getting to hear Riley Baugus play his Appalachian tunes in person. Riley is a world-famous banjo player and Appalachian mountain music man. He currently lives 10 minutes from Stevo in Winston-Salem (who promises me they’ll get to hang out soon, and I’m quite jealous). Riley gives you the history behind his tunes as he picks up the banjo or guitar or violin to transmit to us a tiny bit of America’s musical heritage. The modal melodies of the Appalachian tunes, the thumping rhythms, the lyrics/themes that suck your heart out through the sound of his raspy voice — that unmistakable blend of African and Irish/Scot/English and Native American — it takes me back to the PA mountains of my upbringing. I felt like someone had set a musical icon in front of me.

All this for $6. Ridiculous.  I should mention too that the TRUSTUS Theatre is a really cool performance space! Black interior, uber-comfy seats, lots of leg room & places to put your snacks, a clear view of the stage. Thumbs up.

I bought the Constance book that accompanies The Restoration’s album, which includes lyrics and photos and the full short story which brings Daniel’s vision into focus. Holler if you want to borrow.

And if you want to hear The Restoration for yourself, they’re playing with Riley Baugus in Columbia at the end of May. Show dates/info are posted on their MySpace.