Link: Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic

This was an absolutely wonderful read. Get out there and think, kids!

Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic

There is, among some scientists, a real anti-philosophical bias. The sense that philosophy will eventually disappear. But there’s a lot of philosophical progress, it’s just a progress that’s very hard to see. It’s very hard to see because we see with it. We incorporate philosophical progress into our own way of viewing the world.

via Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic.

I also enjoyed her comment about the power of literature to further philosophical thinking (and vice versa):

There’s a lot of interest in literature and philosophy, and using literature as a philosophical examination. It makes me so happy! Because I was seen as a hard-core analytic philosopher, and when I first began to write novels people thought, Oh, and we thought she was serious! But that’s changed entirely. People take literature seriously, especially in moral philosophy, as thought experiments. A lot of the most developed and effective thought experiments come from novels. Also, novels contribute to making moral progress, changing people’s emotions.

Link: Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic

Fantastic piece published on The Atlantic’s education page yesterday.  Well worth your time to read.

Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic

By society and the job market, I continue to be seen as a “high-achiever” in essence because I was never set up to fail.

No other kid from my block in East Flatbush was so lucky. At their truly public schools (not charters, not magnets, but common schools available to every family in the neighborhood), they routinely faced atrocious conditions including gun violence, overcrowding, and a curriculum that emphasized obedience over innovation. As outsiders to the college-prep “feeder system,” which includes a small number of competitive high schools including Philips Academy and Trinity, the students who persevere despite these formidable demands and manage to graduate, are rarely seen as “high-achieving” by schools like Yale.

via Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic.