Link: Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic

This was an absolutely wonderful read. Get out there and think, kids!

Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic

There is, among some scientists, a real anti-philosophical bias. The sense that philosophy will eventually disappear. But there’s a lot of philosophical progress, it’s just a progress that’s very hard to see. It’s very hard to see because we see with it. We incorporate philosophical progress into our own way of viewing the world.

via Why Study Philosophy? ‘To Challenge Your Own Point of View’ – Hope Reese – The Atlantic.

I also enjoyed her comment about the power of literature to further philosophical thinking (and vice versa):

There’s a lot of interest in literature and philosophy, and using literature as a philosophical examination. It makes me so happy! Because I was seen as a hard-core analytic philosopher, and when I first began to write novels people thought, Oh, and we thought she was serious! But that’s changed entirely. People take literature seriously, especially in moral philosophy, as thought experiments. A lot of the most developed and effective thought experiments come from novels. Also, novels contribute to making moral progress, changing people’s emotions.

Link: Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic

Fantastic piece published on The Atlantic’s education page yesterday.  Well worth your time to read.

Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic

By society and the job market, I continue to be seen as a “high-achiever” in essence because I was never set up to fail.

No other kid from my block in East Flatbush was so lucky. At their truly public schools (not charters, not magnets, but common schools available to every family in the neighborhood), they routinely faced atrocious conditions including gun violence, overcrowding, and a curriculum that emphasized obedience over innovation. As outsiders to the college-prep “feeder system,” which includes a small number of competitive high schools including Philips Academy and Trinity, the students who persevere despite these formidable demands and manage to graduate, are rarely seen as “high-achieving” by schools like Yale.

via Why Ivy League Schools Are So Bad at Economic Diversity – Robin J. Hayes – The Atlantic.

Man, I am so excited about this film | Cinema Purgatorio

Our friends Chris & Emily make independent movies. Really good, really awesome, really thoughtful movies that usually make me cry. So when they decided to make a movie about independent movie makers, I was pretty excited.

Chris wrote a great post recently about how this film, Cinema Purgatorio, grows out of their experiences. Sorta.

I appreciate their perspective on the indie-film culture that can chew up so many artists who are pursuing the good in their art and storytelling. We, the audience, love to consume. We want cheap media, tons of Netflix content, free music downloads, and inexpensive theater tickets.

But there can be problems with that (if I may let Chris wax serious fora moment):

We think film festival culture is self-perpetuating, built to advance the festival over the filmmaker…not unlike many US arts organizations that consume artists rather than nurture them, support them, and promote them.

via True Story? — Chris White HQ.

I promise Cinema Purgatorio won’t be a heavy film. I can promise that without having seen it, because 1) I was in one scene (whee! tiny role! extras rock!) and 2) because I know Chris and Em, and I know how witty and lovely they are when telling stories.

I know you want to watch the trailer for Cinema Purgatorio. Release date is early May.

And you ought to watch their other films too.

Link: God of the Schizophrenic | Christianity Today

Mental illness is a war with many casualties, claiming patients and doctors alike. But a heroic cohort strives to save lives, ease suffering, and thrust light into dark places, bringing into the open afflictions that were once locked away in asylums and sanitariums. Their empathy bears witness to the counsel of the greatest physician of all: “Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted.”

via God of the Schizophrenic | Christianity Today.

A striking personal story.  Worth your time to read.

Big Thinkers on the Only Things Worth Worrying About | Brain Pickings

Big Thinkers on the Only Things Worth Worrying About | Brain Pickings.

^This is a wonderful read. It doesn’t matter if you even agree with what these leading thinkings suggest about the actual problems facing the human race; the selections themselves are a joy to read, offering plenty of thoughts worth considering

My Fav Children’s Book: The Dot and the Line

Norton Juster, who wrote the ever-delightful party of puns The Phantom Tollbooth, also wrote a wonderful little parable called The Dot and the Line: A Romance in Lower Mathematics.

I’ve used the book in my classroom for years when introducing the differences between Romanticism and Neoclassicism, but the story is just perfect on its own, especially in the form of a 1960s cartoon.  Everything I love about literature, puns, wordplay, and midcentury design meet in this short film.

Enjoy. 🙂